Arcade Games

Game Year Genre Manufacturer
'88 Games
'88 Games is the third in the Track & Field game series by Konami, where you test your Olympic skills against other world-class athletes. As the name implies, it is loosely based on (and not licensed by) the 1988 Summer Olympics in Seoul, South Korea. Bronze or silver medals are not good enough - you have to go for the gold to get to the next event. However, you must at least qualify in each event in order to compete in the next event.
1988 Sports / Track & Field Konami
10-Yard Fight
10-Yard Fight is a 1983 American football arcade game that was developed and published in Japan by Irem and published in the United States by Taito and in Europe by Electrocoin. It is the first slightly realistic American football video game ever developed and released. The game is viewed in a top-down perspective and is vertical scrolling. The player does not select plays for either offense or defense. On offense, the player simply receives the ball upon the snap and either attempt to run with the quarterback, toss the ball to a running back, or throw the ball to the one long distance receiver — basically the option offense. On defense, the player chooses one of two players to control, and the computer manipulates the others. The ball can also be punted or a field goal can be attempted. 10-Yard Fight has five levels of difficulty; from easiest to most difficult: high school, college, professional, playoff, and Super Bowl. If the player wins both halves of an "accelerated real time" 30-minute half at an easier level, the player advanced to the next level of difficulty, like a crudely designed career mode.
1983 Sports / Football Irem
1942
1942 is set in the Pacific theater of World War II. The goal is to reach Tokyo and destroy the entire Japanese air fleet. The player pilots a plane dubbed the "Super Ace" (but its appearance is clearly that of a Lockheed P-38 Lightning). The player has to shoot down enemy planes; to avoid enemy fire, the player can perform a roll or "loop-the-loop".
1984 Shooter / Flying Vertical Capcom
1943: The Battle of Midway
The game is set in the Pacific theater of World War II, off the coast of the Midway Atoll. The goal is to attack the Japanese Air Fleet that bombed the players' American Aircraft Carrier, pursue all Japanese Air and Sea forces, fly through the 16 levels of play, make their way to the Japanese battleship Yamato and destroy her. There are 11 levels, including an Air-to-Sea battle (with a huge battleship or an aircraft carrier as an End-Level Boss), while 5 levels cover an all-aerial battle against a squadron of Japanese Bombers and a Mother Bomber that needs to be destroyed. As in 1942, players pilot a P-38. Two buttons are used: one for regular attacks (with several weapons) and one for special actions that executes either a loop (like in 1942) or one of three special attacks that damage the plane. Unlike 1942, the player only has one life, with one refillable energy meter. Destroying a complete formation of red enemy planes will result in a power-up, such as a health boost or a temporary special weapon which replaces the default twin gun.
1987 Shooter / Flying Vertical Capcom
2020 Super Baseball
Super Baseball 2020 is a futuristic baseball video game. The game follows the basic rules of baseball, but there are several upgrades since the game takes place in the year 2020. The most obvious difference from real baseball is that some of the characters in this game are robots. All the human characters are equipped with powerful armor, computer sensors, and jet-packs for improved offense and defensive skills.
1991 Sports / Baseball SNK
Airwolf
Airwolf is a multiplatform shooter video game based on the TV series of the same name. The game places the player in the cockpit of a helicopter (codenamed Airwolf), where the player must attempt to shoot down enemy aircraft and rescue prisoners. The game contains thirty missions, each with the objective being to rescue prisoners being held captive in enemy bases. The layout of each level changes as the player progresses. Airwolf is equipped with missiles and a machine gun in order to fend off enemy craft and their weapons. In order to successfully complete a mission, the player must rescue all prisoners and reach the border of the level without losing all of their lives.
1987 Shooter / Flying Horizontal Kyugo
Alien vs. Predator
San Drad, California, has been overrun by the Aliens, and the cybernetically-enhanced Major Dutch Schaefer and Lieutenant Linn Kurosawa have been abandoned by their superiors and are cornered by a swarm of the Alien drones. Before they can be killed, a pair of the Predators appear and destroy the Aliens. The Predators offer an alliance with the two humans in order to stop the Alien infestation. The players take control of up to three of four characters: Dutch, Linn, a Predator hunter, and a Predator warrior, and battle the Aliens through several environments. In the process, the characters discover that the Alien presence on Earth is the result of an experiment headed by a renegade General Bush of the U.S. Colonial Marines in conjunction with the Weyland-Yutani corporation. They destroy the Alien hive by crashing a military ship into San Drad, causing a huge explosion. The Predator warrior then gives his wrist blades to Dutch and Linn in recognition of their skills as warriors, before the Predators depart back into space.
1994 Fighter / 2.5D Capcom
Altered Beast
Altered Beast is a side scrolling, platform, beat 'em up game that puts the player in control of a centurion who had died in battle. The centurion has been raised from the dead to rescue Zeus' daughter Athena from the demon Neff. The player battles undead and demonic hordes, controlling the shapeshifting hero. He must fight through several levels in order to save the kidnapped goddess.
1988 Platform / Fighter Scrolling Sega
Bad Dudes Vs. DragonNinja
Bad Dudes Vs. DragonNinja is a side-scrolling beat 'em up where the players are set in the role of the titular duo tasked with rescuing "President Ronnie" from ninja kidnappers. Player One controls the character named "Blade" wearing white pants and Player Two controls the character named "Striker" wearing green pants. Players start with the ability to do basic punches, kicks and jumps. Some moves are special like spinning kicks and the ability to charge themselves up with "inner energy" (Qi) by holding the punch button to throw a powerful long-range attack that hits all opponents in front of the player. Players will also come across several power-ups; some are weapons like knives and nunchakus and some recharge a player's health, and yet others add a few seconds to the remaining time.
1988 Platform / Fighter Scrolling Data East
Baseball Stars 2
Baseball Stars 2 is a two-player baseball sports arcade game. You can select from one of 18 teams across two leagues: Exciting League (beginner) and Fighting League (expert). It features 18 teams across the 2 leagues. Players can change pitchers or batters; they can also power up batters, which increases their likelihood of success at the plate.
1992 Sports / Baseball SNK
Blood Bros.
Blood Bros. is a 1990 arcade game developed and published by TAD Corporation in Japan and Europe, while it was later published in North America by Fabtek. It is a spiritual sequel to Cabal, with almost identical mechanics. A bootleg of this game is known as West Story. In 'Blood Bros., two blood brothers, a cowboy and an Indian, team-up to hunt down "the most wanted outlaw in Dodge City," Big Bad John. The gameplay mechanics are extremely similar to TAD Corp.'s earlier machine, Cabal, however this game did not seem to appear as a trackball-controlled variant. The player's characters are seen from behind. Some screens feature protective walls (which can get damaged and shattered by enemy fire). The players have limitless ammunition for their primary gun, but a limited number of sticks of dynamite, with which they must fend off enemy troops. An enemy gauge at the bottom of the screen depletes as foes are destroyed and certain structural features of the screen (usually the ones that collapse when destroyed, rather than simply shattering) are brought down. At the successful completion of a level by fully depleting the enemy gauge, all the remaining buildings onscreen collapse and the player progresses to the next stage, reprising the amusing "victory dance walk" into the horizon from Cabal. Boss fights, however, start from the beginning if a player dies. Power-ups appear from time to time, being released from objects destroyed onscreen or special characters who may run across, such as the small Indian Chief figure or warthogs. Points and weaponry can also be dispensed from the tin can, if you shoot it into the air and juggle it with subsequent shots. Some power-ups give special weapons with increased firepower, others grant extra dynamite or additional points. Two players could play this game, cooperatively, simultaneously.
1990 Shooter / 3rd Person TAD Corporation
Bubble Bobble
In the game, each player controls one of the two Bubble Dragons, Bub and Bob. The player can move along platforms, as well as jump to those above and to the side, similar to most platform games. The player can also blow bubbles. These can trap enemies, who are defeated if the bubble is then burst by the player's spiny back. The bubbles also float for a time before bursting, and can be jumped on, allowing access to otherwise inaccessible areas. Players progress to the next level once all enemies on the current level are defeated.
1986 Platform / Run Jump Taito
Burger Time
Burger Time is a 1982 platformer arcade game created by Data East. The player is chef Peter Pepper, who must walk over hamburger ingredients located across a maze of platforms while avoiding pursuing characters. The object of the game is to assemble a number of hamburgers while avoiding enemy foods. When Peter Pepper walks the length of an ingredient (bun, meat patty, tomato, etc.), it falls one level. If it lands atop another ingredient, the latter in turn falls one level. A burger is completed when all vertically aligned ingredients have been dropped out of the maze and onto a waiting plate. Once all burgers are completed, the game level is finished. Peter Pepper has pepper shots to shake on nearby enemies to stun and render them harmless for a few seconds. Extra shots are obtained by collecting bonus foods, such as coffee, an ice cream cone, or French fries, which appear in the center of the maze when a certain number of ingredients have dropped.
1982 Platform / Run Jump Data East Corporation
Cabal
Cabal offers one player and two-player-simultaneous modes of gameplay. Each player assumes the role of an unnamed commando trying to destroy several enemy military bases. There are 5 stages with 4 screens each. The player starts with a stock of three lives and uses a gun with limitless ammunition and a fixed number of grenades to fend off enemy troops and attack the base. The commando is seen from behind and initially starts behind a protective wall which can be damaged and shattered by enemy fire. To stay alive, the player needs to avoid enemy bullets by running left or right, hiding behind cover, or using a dodge-roll. An enemy gauge at the bottom of the screen depletes as foes are destroyed and certain structures (which collapse rather than shatter) are brought down. When the enemy gauge is emptied, the level is successful completed, all of the remaining buildings on screen collapse, and the player progresses to the next stage. If a player is killed, he is immediately revived at the cost of one life or game overs if he has no lives remaining. Boss fights, however, restart from the beginning if the only remaining player dies. From time to time, power-ups are released from objects destroyed on screen. Some power-ups give special weapons such as an extremely fast-firing machine gun or an automatic shotgun with a lower firing rate and larger area of effect. Others grant extra grenades or additional points.
1988 Shooter / 3rd Person TAD Corporation
Cadillacs and Dinosaurs
Cadillacs and Dinosaurs is a 1993 arcade game released by Capcom. It is a side-scrolling beat 'em up based on the comic book series Xenozoic Tales. The game was produced as a tie-in to the Cadillacs and Dinosaurs animated series which also aired in 1993.
1993 Fighter / 2.5D Capcom
Captain America and the Avengers
Captain America and the Avengers is an arcade game released by Data East in 1991. It features the Marvel Comics characters The Avengers in a side-scrolling brawling and shooting adventure to defeat the evil Red Skull.
1991 Fighter / 2.5D Data East
Captain Commando
Captain Commando is set in a crime-ridden future in the year 2026, where a superhero named Captain Commando, assisted by his three faithful Commando Companions rise up to protect the Earth and all the Galaxy from a gang of super-powered criminals.
1991 Fighter / 2.5D Capcom
Centipede
Centipede is a vertically oriented shoot 'em up arcade game produced by Atari, Inc. in 1980. The game was designed by Ed Logg and Dona Bailey. The player defends against centipedes, spiders, scorpions and fleas, completing a round after eliminating the centipede that winds down the playing field. The centipede starts at the top of the screen, traveling either left or right. When it hits a mushroom or the edge of the screen, it drops one level and switches direction. Thus, more mushrooms on the screen cause the centipede to descend more rapidly. The player can destroy mushrooms by shooting them, but each takes four hits to destroy. If the centipede reaches the bottom of the screen, it moves back and forth within the player area and one-segment "head" centipedes are periodically added. This continues until the player has eliminated both the original centipede and all heads. When all the centipede's segments are destroyed, a new centipede forms at the top of the screen. Every time a centipede is eliminated, however, the next one is one segment shorter and is accompanied by one additional, fast-moving "head" centipede.
1980 Shooter / Gallery Atari
Contra
In Contra, the player controls one of two armed military commandos named Bill and Lance, who are sent on a mission to neutralize a terrorist group called the Red Falcon Organization that is planning to take over the Earth. The main character is equipped with a rifle with an unlimited amount of ammunition. The player can also jump, move and fire in eight directions, as well as move or jump simultaneously while firing. A single hit from any enemy, bullet, or other hazard will instantly kill the player character and discard the current weapon.
1987 Platform / Shooter Scrolling Konami
Crime Fighters
Crime Fighters is a beat-em up arcade game where your job is to rescue several women that have been kidnapped by a crime boss and clean up the streets by pummeling as many gang members as possible with your bare hands, as well as anything else you might possibly discover. You will travel through eight levels throughout the city, in locations that range from subways to the docks. At the end of every stage is a fight with a boss character, many of whom happen to be knockoffs of famous horror movie antagonists like Freddy Kruger and Jason Voorhees. Scoring is handled by a system wherein you simply get a point for every enemy you kill. Occasionally examples of cartoon physics pop up, such as when your character gets squashed flat by a moving steamroller or a falling billboard.
1989 Fighter / 2.5D Konami
Cyberball
Cyberball is an Atari Games arcade game of 7-man American football, using robotic avatars of different speeds, sizes, and skill sets. The game replaces the standard downs system with an explosive ball that progresses from "cool" to "warm", "hot", and "critical" status as it is used. Players can only defuse the ball, resetting it from its current state back to "cool" by crossing the 50 yard line or by change of possession, whether through touchdown, interception or fumble. A robot holding a critical ball while being tackled is destroyed along with the ball. The robots also possess finite durability. As offensive units are tackled, they wear down, finally issuing smoke and then flames after a number of hits. A flaming robot will explode when hit, thereby fumbling the ball. Players can upgrade robots with faster and more durable units using money bonuses they earn during play.
1988 Sports / Football Atari Games
Cyberbots: Fullmetal Madness
Cyberbots: Fullmetal Madness is a fighting game developed and published by Capcom in 1995. It is a spin-off of the beat-'em-up game Armored Warriors. It boasts a large number of selectable options, parts, and mecha that permit the player to format their play style to their preference. Similar to the Armored Core series, different legs (which affect movement abilities), arms (which affect reach and melee capabilities), and weapons can be mixed and matched between the selectable robots available to the player. Gameplay in Cyberbots is similar to other Capcom-created fighting games, with a medium-sized command list of executing various attacks available to each individual robot. Battles are a duel-formatted affair with players and the computer fighting against one another to proceed to the next battle.
1995 Fighter / Versus Capcom
Dig Dug
Dig Dug is an arcade game developed and published by Namco in Japan in 1982 for Namco Galaga hardware. It was later published outside of Japan by Atari. The objective of Dig Dug is to eliminate underground-dwelling monsters by inflating them with an air pump until they explode, or by dropping rocks on them. There are two kinds of enemies in the game: "Pookas" (a race of cute round red monsters, said to be modeled after tomatoes, that wear yellow goggles) and "Fygars" (a race of green dragons that can breathe fire while their wings flash). The player's character is the eponymous Dig Dug, dressed in white and blue and able to dig tunnels through destructible environments. Dig Dug will be killed if he is caught by either a Pooka or a Fygar, burned by a Fygar's fire, or crushed by a rock.
1982 Maze / Digging Namco
Donkey Kong
Donkey Kong is an arcade game released by Nintendo in 1981. It is an early example of the platform game genre, as the gameplay focuses on maneuvering the main character across a series of platforms while dodging and jumping over obstacles. In the game, Jumpman (since renamed Mario) must rescue a damsel in distress, Lady (now named Pauline) from a giant ape named Donkey Kong. The hero and ape later became two of Nintendo's most popular characters. The game was the latest in a series of efforts by Nintendo to break into the North American market. Hiroshi Yamauchi, Nintendo's president at the time, assigned the project to a first-time game designer named Shigeru Miyamoto. Drawing from a wide range of inspirations, including Popeye, Beauty and the Beast and King Kong, Miyamoto developed the scenario and designed the game alongside Nintendo's chief engineer, Gunpei Yokoi. The two men broke new ground by using graphics as a means of characterization, including cut scenes to advance the game's plot, and integrating multiple stages into the gameplay. Despite initial misgivings on the part of Nintendo's American staff, Donkey Kong proved a success in North America and Japan.
1981 Platform / Run Jump Nintendo
Donkey Kong Junior
Donkey Kong Junior is a 1982 arcade-style platform video game by Nintendo. Mario (known as Jumpman in Donkey Kong) has captured Donkey Kong and placed him in a cage as punishment for kidnapping his girlfriend Pauline. Donkey Kong Jr. must rescue his father from Mario by working his way through a series of stages. Mario attempts to stop Donkey Kong Junior by releasing the many animals he controls to knock Donkey Kong Junior off the vines and platforms. Donkey Kong Junior defeats Mario if the player completes the fourth stage by putting all six keys in their locks, making the floor disappear.
1982 Platform / Run Jump Nintendo
Double Dragon
Double Dragon is the story of Billy and Jimmy Lee, twin brothers trained in the fighting style of Sou-Setsu-Ken. Together, they manage a small martial arts training school, teaching their students in self-defense. One day, Billy's girlfriend, Marian, is kidnapped off the street by the "Black Warriors", a savage street gang led by a man named Willy. The Black Warriors demand the Lee brothers disclose their martial arts secrets in exchange for Marian's freedom. The Lee brothers set out on a rescue mission to crush the Black Warriors and save Marian.
1987 Fighter / 2.5D Technos Japan
Dungeons & Dragons: Shadow Over Mystara
Dungeons & Dragons: Shadow Over Mystara is a side-scrolling arcade game featuring six different characters fighting iconic Dungeons & Dragons monsters. In addition to the original four heroes found in its predecessor, Dungeons & Dragons: Tower of Doom (Cleric, Dwarf, Elf and Fighter), Shadow of Mystara adds a Thief and a Magic-User to the selection. Furthermore, with the inclusion of two separate versions of each character's sprite set, the game allows up to two players to select the same character (in Tower of Doom each of the characters could only be selected once), effectively giving the game 12 "different" characters to choose from. The two Clerics and two Magic Users also have subtle differences within their spell books. The controls use four buttons: Attack, Jump, Select (brings up a small inventory ring around the character allowing the player to choose what item is set in the Use slot) and Use. The Cleric, Elf and Magic-User also have two extra rings for their spells, with the Jump button used to switch from ring to ring. While the game uses the same kick harness as the previous game, the Select and Use buttons are reversed. Shadow over Mystara also introduced a selection of special moves which are executed by moving the joystick and tapping the buttons in certain combinations, in a way similar to the Street Fighter series. The characters (except for the Magic-User) have a Dashing Attack as well as a Rising Attack which can be used to combo monsters or even juggle them in the air. Most characters (again, with the exception of the Magic-User and also Cleric) also have a Megacrush, a move common to nearly all of Capcom side-scrollers, which damages all enemies standing close enough to the character but in turn also damaging the player themselves.
1996 Fighter / 2.5D Capcom
Dungeons & Dragons: Tower of Doom
Dungeons & Dragons: Tower of Doom is a side-scrolling arcade game featuring four different characters (cleric, dwarf, elf, fighter) fighting iconic Dungeons & Dragons monsters. Bosses include a troll that regenerates unless burned, a large black dragon, the dreaded Shadow Elf (Mystara's equivalent of the drow), a beholder, the optional superboss Flamewing (a great wyrm red dragon) and the final boss Deimos (an archlich). At points in the game the players are presented with a choice of paths to take to continue progress. Each path goes to a different area, and it is impossible to visit every area in a single play. The gameplay is more technical than the average on beat'em up games. In addition to the usual basic attacks and jumping it includes blocking, strong attacks, turning attacks, dashing attacks, crouching and evading. It also requires the use of careful tactics, as most enemies have the same abilities as the heroes and can out-range them, too. Daggers, hammers, arrows and burning oils can be used as throwing weapons, and many enemies have similar weapons. Spells can be used by means of magical rings or by the two playable spellcasters (a cleric and an elf).
1994 Fighter / 2.5D Capcom
Elevator Action Returns
Elevator Action Returns, released as Elevator Action II in North America, is a side-scrolling action game by Taito originally released for the arcades in 1994 as a sequel to the 1983 arcade game Elevator Action. Elevator Action Returns retains the elevator-based gimmick from the original, but expands and improves on the gameplay system and replaces the spy motif with a new scenario involving a paramilitary team fighting against a terrorist group. The controls consists of an eight-way joystick and two action buttons (shoot and jump). The objective of the game is to enter all the red-colored doors in each stages and then proceed to the exit. If the player misses a door, he or she will not be allowed to go any further after a certain point. Each player has a health gauge that shows the amount of damage that his or her character is allowed to sustain; when the gauge reaches zero, the player will lose a life. Many additions have also been made to the play mechanics thanks to the advancement in technology such as four-way scrolling (the original could only scroll vertically), new moves and weapons for the player, multiple characters and a two-players cooperative mode. The player can uncover items by destroying objects in the scenery such as trash cans, garbage piles, sandbags and crates. There are also blue-colored doors that will the player a random item through a roulette drawing system. Items include health refills, special firearms, sub-weapons and bonus points. Like in the original game, the player's default weapon is a semi-automatic handgun with unlimited ammunition. However, the player has the option to upgrade to a stronger firearm as well, a missile launcher or an automatic weapon. If the ammo for either weapon runs out, the player will revert to the default handgun. However, if the player picks up a weapon of the same type he/she is currently wielding, then the ammunition of the new weapon is instead added to the current amount. The player can conserve ammo by attacking an enemy at close range, causing he/she to use a melee attack instead of firing a weapon. When an enemy is defeated with a close-range attack, the amount of points awarded will be doubled. The player can also attack the enemy with a jumping attack depending on the timing. The player can also throw an explosive (which serves as the character's sub-weapon) by pressing the shoot and jump buttons simultaneously while standing or crouching. The type of explosive used by the player varies depending on the character. The player can use explosives to take down several enemies in a fixed range, allowing players to accumulate more points than by killing them with simple gunfire. Objects in the environment can also be used to fight enemies. Like in the original game, elevators can be used to crush enemies standing above or below one. There are also oil drums that can be exploded with gunfire. Like the player's sub-weapons, they will leave a trail of fire that will burn off any enemy that comes in contact with it. Enemies that are killed by a trail of fire gives out more points. During the later half of the game, the player will also have to deal with electric barriers that will harm both players and enemies alike. If an enemy is killed with an electric barrier, the player will be awarded with additional points.
1993 Platform / Shooter Taito
Fatal Fury: King of Fighters
The plot of Fatal Fury centers around a martial arts tournament known as the "King of Fighters" tournament, held in the fictional American city of South Town and sponsored by local crime boss Geese Howard. Ten years prior to the events of the game, Geese murdered a rival martial artist named Jeff Bogard who was on his trail. Now, Jeff's sons, Terry and Andy, along with their friend Joe Higashi, enter the tournament to get their revenge on Geese.
1991 Fighter / Versus SNK (Neo Geo)
Final Fight
Final Fight can be played by up to two players simultaneously, with each player controlling a different character. Before the game begins, the player chooses between the three main characters, Guy, Cody, and Haggar, each with his own fighting style and attributes. Guy is the weakest but has faster attacks, Haggar is the strongest but also the slowest, and Cody has all-round attributes. Final Fight consists of six stages or "rounds", as well as two bonus rounds. Each round takes place in a different section of Metro City such as the Slums and the Subway, with most rounds featuring more than one level. At the end of each round the player will face a boss character unique to that round.
1989 Fighter / 2.5D Capcom
Frogger
Frogger is an arcade game developed by Konami and introduced in 1981. The object of the game is to direct frogs to their homes one by one. To do this, each frog must avoid cars while crossing a busy road and navigate a river full of hazards. Skillful players may obtain some bonuses along the way. The game is regarded as a classic from the golden age of video arcade games and was noted for its novel gameplay and theme. It was also an early example of a game using more than one CPU, as it used two Z80 processors.
1981 Maze Konami
Galaga
Galaga is a fixed shooter arcade game developed and published by Namco in Japan and published by Midway in North America in 1981. It is the sequel to Galaxian, released in 1979. The gameplay of Galaga puts the player in control of a space ship which is situated on the bottom of the screen. At the beginning of each stage, the area is empty, but over time, enemy aliens fly in formation, and once all of the enemies arrive on screen, they will come down at the player's ship in formations of one or more and may either shoot it or collide with it. During the entire stage, the player may fire upon the enemies, and once all enemies are vanquished, the player moves onto the next stage. The objective of Galaga is to score as many points as possible by destroying insect-like enemies. The player controls a starfighter that can move left and right along the bottom of the playfield. Enemies swarm in groups in a formation near the top of the screen, and then begin flying down toward the player, firing bombs at the fighter. The game ends when the player's last fighter is lost, either by colliding with an enemy or one of its bullets, or by being captured. Galaga introduces a number of new features over its predecessor, Galaxian. Among these is the ability to fire more than one bullet at a time, a count of the player's "hit/miss ratio" at the end of the game, and a bonus "Challenging Stage" that occurs every few levels, in which a series of enemies fly onto and out of the screen in set patterns without firing at the player's ship or trying to crash into it.
1981 Shooter / Gallery Namco
Galaxian
Galaxian is an arcade game that was developed by Namco and released in October 1979. It is a fixed shooter game in which the player controls a spaceship at the bottom of the screen, and shoots enemies descending in various directions. Galaxian expanded on the formula pioneered by Space Invaders. As in the earlier game, Galaxian featured a horde of attacking aliens that exchanged shots with the player. In contrast to Space Invaders, Galaxian added an element of drama by having the aliens periodically make kamikaze-like dives at the player's ship, the Galaxip. This made it the first game to feature enemies with individual personalities.
1979 Shooter / Gallery Namco
Gauntlet
Gauntlet is a fantasy-themed hack and slash 1985 arcade game by Atari Games. It is noted as the first class-based multiplayer game. Released during the emergence of popularity of other role-playing games like Dungeons & Dragons, the game was a sensation, being one of the first true dungeon crawl arcade games. The players, up to four at once in the arcade version, select among four playable fantasy-based characters: The Warrior, Wizard, Valkyrie, or Elf. Each character has his or her own unique strength and weaknesses. For example, the Warrior is strongest in hand-to-hand combat, the Wizard has the most powerful magic, the Valkyrie has the best armor and the Elf is the fastest in movement. Upon selecting a playable character, the gameplay is set within a series of top-down, third-person perspective mazes where the object is to find and touch the designated exit in every level. An assortment of special items can be located in each level that increase player's character's health, unlock doors, gain more points and magical potions that can destroy all of the enemies on screen. The enemies are an assortment of fantasy-based monsters, including ghosts, grunts, demons, lobbers, sorcerers and thieves. Each enters the level through specific generators, which can be destroyed. While there are no bosses in the game, the most dangerous enemy is "Death", who can not only drain a character's health, but is difficult to destroy. As the game progresses, higher levels of skill are needed to reach the exit, with success often depending on the willingness of the players to cooperate by sharing food and luring monsters into places where they can be engaged and slaughtered more conveniently. While contact with enemies reduces the player's health, health also slowly drains on its own, thus creating a time limit.
1985 Maze / Shooter Large Atari
Ghosts ’n Goblins
Ghosts ’n Goblins is a platform game where the player controls a knight, named Sir Arthur, who must defeat zombies, ogres, demons, armored giants, dragons, and other undead creatures in order to rescue Princess Prin Prin, who has been kidnapped by Satan, King of Demon World. Along the way the player can pick up new weapons, bonuses and extra suits of armor that can help in this task.
1985 Platform / Fighter Scrolling Capcom
Golden Axe
Golden Axe is a side-scrolling, beat ’em up, hack and slash arcade video game released in 1989 by Sega. The game takes place in the fictional land of Yuria, a Conan the Barbarian-style high fantasy medieval world. An evil entity known as Death Adder has captured the King and his daughter, and holds them captive in their castle. He also finds the Golden Axe, the magical emblem of Yuria, and threatens to destroy both the axe and the royal family unless the people of Yuria accept him as their ruler. Three Warriors set out on a quest to rescue Yuria and avenge their losses at the hands of Death Adder. The first is a battle axe-wielding dwarf, Gilius Thunderhead, from the mines of Wolud, whose twin brother was killed by the soldiers of Death Adder. Another is a male barbarian, Ax Battler, wielding a two handed broadsword looking for revenge for the murder of his mother. The last is a long-sword-wielding Tyris Flare, an amazon, whose parents were both killed by Death Adder. Progress is made through the game by fighting through Death Adder's henchmen, including men armed with clubs and maces, skeleton warriors, and knights. Players are able to attack using their weapon, jump and cast spells that hurt all enemies on the screen. The force of this magic depends on the number of "bars" of magic power currently available. The bars are filled by collecting blue "magic potions" attained by kicking little sprites who then drop the potions. These sprites appear during regular levels and during bonus stages in between levels. The male warrior Ax is able to cast earth spells. The dwarf Gilius casts lightning spells and the female warrior Tyris casts fire magic. Each character has a different number of maximum magic bars and varying ranges of attack.
1989 Fighter / 2.5D Sega
Joe & Mac: Caveman Ninja
Joe & Mac is a 1991 platform arcade game released by Data East. The game stars the green-haired Joe and the blue-haired Mac, cavemen who battle through numerous prehistoric levels using weapons such as boomerangs, bones, fire, flints, electricity, stone wheels, and clubs. The objective of the game is to rescue a group of women who were kidnapped by a rival tribe of cavemen. The game features a health system by which the player loses health over a period of time, apart from during boss battles. A two-player mode is available. In some versions both characters are capable of damaging each other.
1991 Platform / Shooter Scrolling Data East
Joust
Joust is a platform arcade game developed by Williams Electronics and released in 1982. The player uses a button and joystick to control a knight riding a flying ostrich. The object is to progress through levels by defeating groups of enemy knights riding buzzards.
1982 Platform / Run Jump Williams
King of the Monsters
King of the Monsters is a fighting/wrestling arcade game released by SNK in 1991. Players get to choose any one of six monsters for battle, and two players can join forces to fight the monsters together. Battles end when one of the monsters is pinned for a three count or if time expires (in which case the player loses). The game consists of 12 total levels: the player first must defeat all six monsters, with the last monster being oneself, but in a different palette. Then the player must defeat the six monsters again, in the same order, but this time in different cities.
1991 Fighter / Multiplay SNK
King of the Monsters 2
King of the Monsters 2 is a fighting/beat-'em-up arcade game released by SNK in 1992. The game takes the original in a new direction by using three of the monsters from the original game as heroes in a side-scrolling beat-'em-up. Geon, Astro Guy, and Woo are all upgraded to defend Earth against an alien threat led by a creature called Famardy. The game also features a 2-player competition mode.
1992 Fighter / Multiplay SNK
Mario Bros.
Mario Bros. is a platform game published and developed for arcades by Nintendo in 1983. It was created by Shigeru Miyamoto. In the game, Mario is portrayed as an Italian-American plumber who, along with his younger brother Luigi, has to defeat creatures that have been coming from the sewers below New York City. The gameplay focuses on Mario's extermination of them by flipping them on their backs and kicking them away. The objective of the game is to defeat all of the enemies in each phase. The mechanics of Mario Bros. involve only running and jumping. Unlike future Mario games, players cannot jump on enemies and squash them, unless they were already turned on their back. Each phase is a series of platforms with pipes at each corner of the screen, along with an object called a "POW" block in the center. Phases use wraparound, meaning that enemies and players that go off to one side will reappear on the opposite side.
1983 Platform / Run Jump Nintendo
Marvel Super Heroes vs. Street Fighter
Marvel Super Heroes vs. Street Fighter is a crossover fighting video game developed and published by Capcom. It is the sequel to X-Men vs. Street Fighter and the second installment in the Marvel vs. Capcom series. The game was first released as an arcade game in 1997. The gameplay and aesthetics of Marvel Super Heroes vs. Street Fighter remain similar to X-Men vs. Street Fighter. Each player selects two characters to compete in a one-on-one tag team fight, attempting to defeat the opposing team. The game replaces most of the X-Men cast from the previous installment with characters from other Marvel properties. In addition, it introduces a new gameplay mechanic known as the "Variable Assist," which would be used in future Marvel vs. Capcom titles.
1998 Fighter / Versus Capcom
Marvel vs. Capcom: Clash of Super Heroes
Marvel vs. Capcom: Clash of Super Heroes is the fifth Marvel Comics-licensed fighting game by Capcom and the third game in the Marvel vs. Capcom series. In contrast to X-Men vs. Street Fighter and Marvel Super Heroes vs. Street Fighter, the game features characters from numerous Capcom franchises such as Mega Man and Strider, rather than just Street Fighter characters. The game takes place within the Marvel comic continuity, as Professor Charles Xavier calls out for heroes to stop him before he merges with the consciousness of Magneto and becomes the being known as Onslaught, the final boss. The game was developed in late 1997 and first released in January 1998.
1998 Fighter / Versus Capcom
Metal Slug
Metal Slug is a run-and-gun arcade game developed and originally released by Nazca Corporation and later published by SNK. It was originally released in 1996 for the Neo Geo MVS arcade platform. The game is widely known for its sense of humor, fluid hand-drawn animation, and fast paced two-player action. Players control Marco and Tarma, both members of the special-ops force Team Peregrine Falcon (commonly known as Team PF), and battle their way through stage after stage of intense action. The goal is to try to overthrow General Morden and win back the stolen weapon, the Metal Slug. Players must blast through waves of enemies and machines (while also jumping over any obstacles in the way) to advance through the stages. Weapons such as heavy machine guns, shotguns, rocket launchers and flamethrowers, as well as the Metal Slug itself, will make the battle easier.
1996 Platform / Shooter Scrolling Nazca
Metal Slug 2
Metal Slug 2 is a run-and-gun arcade game developed by SNK. It was released in 1998 for the Neo-Geo MVS arcade platform as the sequel to the popular 1996 game Metal Slug. The game added several new features to the gameplay of the original Metal Slug, such as new weapons, vehicles and the ability to transform the character. As Marco, Eri, Tarma, or Fio, you must defeat the evil General Morden and his henchman. To do this, you must defeat various enemies that get in your way. Throughout the game, you can collect new weapons including the Heavy Machine Gun, Shot Gun, Rocket Launcher, Flame Shot, Laser Shot, Flame Bottles, and Armor Piercer. Also scattered throughout the game are four different vehicles: Metal Slug, Slug Flyer, Camel Slug, and SlugNoid. By using these vehicles, you can cause awesome destruction against Morden's evil army. Other items such as energy, extra ammunition, and food (eat too much and your player will gain weight) are also found throughout the game.
1998 Platform / Shooter Scrolling SNK
Metal Slug 3
Metal Slug 3 is a run-and-gun arcade game developed by SNK. It was originally released in 2000 for the Neo-Geo MVS arcade platform as the sequel to Metal Slug 2/Metal Slug X. The game added several new features to the gameplay of the original Metal Slug and Metal Slug 2, such as new weapons and vehicles, as well as introducing branching paths into the series. The rebellion orchestrated by General Morden to bring about a new global regime is now ancient history, and order and peace has begun to return to the world. Morden, brought back into power, was attempting another coup d'état, but government forces got wind of the plot beforehand and pre-empted the impending assault. Instrumental in squashing Morden's rebel forces, Marco and Tarma of the Peregrine Falcon Strike Force are ordered to lead the team after their earlier requests for resignation were denied. Although General Morden has been written off as "missing" by his followers, they have hidden themselves throughout the world, and Marco and Tarma's abilities and experience are seen as a necessity to destroy remaining rebel strongholds, one by one. Throughout the furious fighting against the holdouts, Marco and Tarma cannot help but suspect Morden's involvement in this new evil plan for world domination.
2000 Platform / Shooter Scrolling SNK
Metal Slug 4
Metal Slug 4 is a run-and-gun arcade game for the Neo-Geo console/arcade platform created by SNK. It was released in 2002 for the MVS arcade platform, and is the fourth game in the Metal Slug series. One year after the events of Metal Slug 3, the world is trembling under the new threat of a mysterious but deadly cyber virus that threatens to attack and destroy any nation's military computer system. With Tarma and Eri unable to help due to their own assignments in the matter, Marco and Fio are called in to investigate the situation and are joined by two newcomers, Nadia and Trevor. In their investigation, the group discovers that a terrorist organization known as Amadeus is behind the nefarious plot and that they head into battle against Amadeus' forces, hoping to destroy the cyber virus before it gets the chance to wipe out the entire world's military computer system.
2002 Platform / Shooter Scrolling Mega Enterprise
Metal Slug 5
Metal Slug 5 is a run-and-gun arcade game for the Neo-Geo console/arcade platform created by SNK Playmore. It was released in 2003 for the MVS arcade platform, is the fifth game in the Metal Slug series, and was one of the last games for the Neo Geo system. The game was developed by Noise Factory/SNK Playmore. A special disc that contains deep and intricate secrets about the Metal Slug project is stolen by a mysterious group called the Ptolemaic Army, whose specialty lies from within archaeological excavation and espionage. Marco and Tarma of the Peregrine Falcon Strike Force follow in hot pursuit against the group and in the process are joined by Eri and Fio of SPARROWS. Together once more, the quartet investigate the shrouded objective of the Ptolemaic Army.
2003 Platform / Shooter Scrolling Noise Factory
Metal Slug X
Metal Slug X is a modified version of Metal Slug 2 released in 1999 for the Neo-Geo console/arcade platform by SNK. It introduces some new features like new weapons, rearranged enemy replacement and greater difficulty.
1996 Platform / Shooter Scrolling Nazca
Michael Jackson's Moonwalker
Michael Jackson's Moonwalker is an arcade video game by Sega and Triumph International. The game is essentially a beat-em-up, although Jackson attacks with magic powers instead of physical contact, and has the ability to shoot magic power at enemies instead of getting close enough for a melee attack. A map of the stage is shown before it begins, and after which, Jackson must get from the start to the end without losing all his health while rescuing all the children and defeating all the enemies along the way. The story, which is taken from the Moonwalker film, follows Michael, using various music and dance related abilities, on a quest to save kidnapped children from the hands of the evil "Mr. Big". The games incorporated synthesized versions of the musician's hits, such as "Beat It" and "Smooth Criminal."
1990 Maze / Fighter Sega
Millipede
Millipede is a 1982 arcade game by Atari, Inc. and is the sequel to the arcade hit Centipede. The objective of the game is to score as many points as possible by destroying all segments of the millipede as it moves toward the bottom of the screen, as well as destroying and avoiding other enemies. The game is played with a trackball and a single fire button, which can be held down for rapid-fire. The game is over when the player's last life is lost.
1982 Shooter / Gallery Atari
Mortal Kombat
Mortal Kombat is an arcade fighting game developed and published by Midway Games in 1992 as the first title in the Mortal Kombat series. The game introduced many key aspects of the Mortal Kombat series, including the unique five-button control scheme and gory finishing moves. The game focuses on the journey of the monk Liu Kang to save Earth from the evil sorcerer Shang Tsung, ending with their confrontation in the tournament known as Mortal Kombat. The series takes place in a fictional universe that consists of six surviving realms which, according to in-game backstories, were created by the Elder Gods. Players select one of seven characters, each of which hails from one of these realms. The controls consist of five buttons arranged in an "X" pattern: four buttons for high and low punches and kicks with a block button at the center, as well as an eight-way joystick. Attacks can vary depending on the player's distance from the opponent. All player characters have a shared set of attacks performed by holding the joystick in various directions, such as leg sweep and an uppercut; the latter attack knocks the enemy high into the air and causes a large amount of damage.
1992 Fighter / Versus Midway
Mortal Kombat 2
Mortal Kombat II (commonly abbreviated as MKII) is a competitive fighting game originally produced by Midway Games for the arcades in 1993. It is the second game in the Mortal Kombat series, improving the gameplay and expanding the mythos of the original Mortal Kombat, notably introducing more varied Fatality finishing moves and several iconic characters. The game's plot continues from the first game, featuring the next Mortal Kombat tournament set in the otherdimensional realm of Outworld, with the Outworld and Earthrealm representatives fighting each other on their way to challenge the evil emperor Shao Kahn. The gameplay system of Mortal Kombat II is an improved version of that from the original Mortal Kombat. There are several changes in standard moves: a crouching punch and turnaround kick are added, low and high kicks have greater differentiation (be they crouching or standing up), the roundhouse kick are made more powerful (knocking an opponent across the screen, like the game's uppercut), and it is easier to perform a combo due to reduced recovery times for attacks. Returning characters also gained new special moves, including some to be used in mid-air, and the game plays almost twice as fast as the original. However, all playable characters in the game still share most generic attributes (such as power and jump height) and all normal moves are also the same between each character. As with its predecessor, matches are divided into rounds, and the first player to win two rounds by fully depleting their opponent's life bar is the winner; at this point the losing character will become dazed and the winner is given the opportunity of using a finishing move. Mortal Kombat II lacks the "Test Your Might" bonus games and point system from the first game, in favor of a consecutive win tally where wins are represented by icons. The game marked the introduction of multiple Fatalities (post-match animations of the victorious characters executing their defeated foes) as well as additional, non-lethal finishing moves to the franchise: Babalities (turning the opponent into a crying baby), Friendships (a non-malicious interaction, such as dancing or giving a gift to the defeated opponent) and additional stage-specific Fatalities (the winner uppercutting his or her opponent into an abyss below, spikes in the ceiling, or a pool of acid in the background).
1993 Fighter / Versus Midway
Mortal Kombat 3
Mortal Kombat 3 (MK3) is a fighting video game developed by Midway Games and first released into arcades in 1995 as the third game in the Mortal Kombat series. As in the previous games, it has a cast of characters that players choose from and guide through a series of battles against other opponents. The game avoids the tournament storyline of its predecessors, as various warriors instead fight against the returning Shao Kahn, who has resurrected his bride Sindel and started an invasion of Earthrealm. The third installment of Mortal Kombat retains the blood and gory attacks that defined the series. It introduces new types of the Fatality finishing moves, including Animalities. Other features new to the series were combos, predefined sequences used to perform a series of consecutive attacks. A "Run" button was also added, allowing players to briefly dash toward the opponent, as were "Kombat Kodes", an unlockable content system using various symbols that can be entered before two-player matches to achieve certain effects. Mortal Kombat 3 builds further on the gameplay of the previous game. A "Run" button, accompanied by a "Run" meter, was introduced. This was primarily to address concern from fans who thought that the previous games gave too much of an advantage to the defending player. The Run meter is drained by running (the character cannot run backwards, only forwards) and by performing combos. "Chain combos", also known as pre-programmed combos (labeled "dial-a-combos") were also introduced. Chain combos are button sequences that cannot be interrupted once one hit connects; some chain combos end with an uppercut or other move that knocks the opponent into the air, so that more damage can be dealt via a traditional juggle combo. To please players of various skill levels, a "Choose Your Destiny" screen appears in the single player mode to allow player-selectable difficulty.
1995 Fighter / Versus Midway Games
Mr. Do!
Mr. Do! is an arcade game created by Universal in 1982. It is the first game in the Mr. Do series. It is similar in some ways to Namco's popular Dig Dug title. The object of Mr. Do! is to score as many points as possible by digging tunnels through the ground and collecting cherries. The title character, Mr. Do (a circus clown—except for the original Japanese version of the game in which he is a snowman. See flyer image at right of this text), is constantly chased by red monsters resembling small dinosaurs, and the player loses a life if Mr. Do is caught by one. The game is over when the last life is lost. Cherries are distributed throughout the level in groups of eight. 500 bonus points are awarded if Mr. Do collects eight cherries in a row without stopping. A level is complete when all cherries are removed, all monsters are destroyed, "EXTRA" is spelled, or a diamond is found. Mr. Do can defeat the monsters by hitting them with his bouncing "power ball" or by dropping large apples on them. While the power ball is bouncing toward a monster, Mr. Do is defenseless. If the ball bounces into an area where there are no monsters to hit (such as behind a fallen apple), Mr. Do cannot use it again until he has retrieved it. When the power ball hits a monster, it then reforms in Mr. Do's hands after a delay that increases with each use. Mr. Do or the red monsters can push an apple off the edge of a vertical tunnel and crush one or more monsters. If an apple falls more than its own height, it breaks and disappears. Mr. Do can also be crushed by a falling apple causing a loss of life. Occasionally, the red monsters transform briefly into more powerful multicolored monsters that can tunnel through the ground. If one of these digs through a cherry, it leaves fewer cherries (and fewer points) for Mr. Do to collect. When it digs under an apple, it often crushes itself, other red/blue monsters, and/or Mr. Do. Each time the score passes a certain threshold during play (5000 points), a letter from the word "EXTRA" appears on the playfield as an Alphamonster, and the player can defeat or be defeated by this monster in the same way as a red monster. Defeating an Alphamonster awards that letter to the player, and collecting all five letters of the word completes the level, plays a cut scene inexplicably playing the theme to Astro Boy, and awards the player an extra life. Alphamonsters attempt to eat any apples they encounter, which makes them difficult (but not impossible) to crush. The red monsters spawn at the center of the screen. After they have all appeared, the generator will turn into a food item; picking this up scores bonus points, freezes all the red monsters, and calls out an Alphamonster and three large blue monsters. The latter can eat apples as well. The red monsters stay frozen (but still deadly) until the player either defeats all three blue monsters, defeats the Alphamonster (in which case any remaining blue monsters are turned into apples), loses a life, or completes the stage. Rarely, dropping an apple will reveal a diamond which, if collected within about 15 seconds, completes the level and awards a bonus credit to the player (as well as 8000 points), allowing him or her to play a free game. (This feature is relatively uncommon among arcade video games, though it is a standard feature of many pinball machines.)
1982 Maze / Digging Universal
Ms. Pac-Man
Ms. Pac-Man is an arcade video game from the Golden Age and is one of the most popular arcade video games of all time. It was produced in 1982 by Bally/Midway. It is the sequel to 1980's Pac-Man, developed by Namco. Ms. Pac-Man introduced a female protagonist, new maze designs, and several other gameplay improvements over the original Pac-Man. The gameplay of Ms. Pac-Man is nearly identical to that of Pac-Man. The player earns points by eating pellets and avoiding ghosts (contact with one causes Ms. Pac-Man to lose a life). Eating an energizer (or "power pellet") causes the ghosts to turn blue, allowing them to be eaten for extra points. Bonus fruits can be eaten for increasing point values, twice per round. As the rounds increase, the speed increases, and energizers generally lessen the extent of the ghosts' vulnerability, eventually stopping altogether.
1981 Maze Midway
NBA Hangtime
NBA Hangtime is a basketball arcade game developed and published by Midway and released in 1996. Hangtime was the third basketball game by the original development team behind the NBA Jam series. Features introduced in Hangtime included character creation, alley-oops and double dunks. The gameplay is largely the same as the Midway's NBA Jam games, with some additions. One of the most prominent additions is the "Create Player" feature, which allows players to create a custom basketball player, specifying height, weight, power, shooting and defensive skills using a limited number of attribute points. Created players can be made more powerful as players earn additional attribute points by winning games. The game retains many of the same rules of NBA Jam Tournament Edition, including the two-on-two match ups, statistics tracking, legal pushing and "on fire" mode. Additions to the gameplay include spin moves, alley oops and double slam dunks - a slam dunk performed after one team member in the middle of a dunk passes to the other member. Alley-oops and double dunks can trigger the new "team fire" mode in which both team members are on fire.
1996 Sports / Basketball Midway
NBA Jam
NBA Jam is a basketball arcade game published and developed by Midway in 1993. It is the first entry in the NBA Jam series. NBA Jam features 2-on-2 basketball games. It was one of the first sports games to feature NBA-licensed teams and players, and their real digitized likenesses. A key feature of NBA Jam is the exaggerated nature of the play; players jump many times their own height, making slam dunks that defy both human capabilities and the laws of physics. There are no fouls, free throws, or violations except goaltending and 24-second violations. This means the player is able to freely shove or elbow his opponent out of the way. Additionally, if a player makes three baskets in a row, he becomes "on fire" and has unlimited turbo and increased shooting precision. The "on fire" mode continues until the other team scores, or until the player who is "on fire" scores 4 additional consecutive baskets while "on fire."
1993 Sports / Basketball Midway
NBA Jam Tournament Edition
NBA Jam is a basketball arcade game published and developed by Midway and released in 1995 as an update to the original NBA Jam. It features updated rosters, new features and easter eggs combined with the same gameplay of the original. Teams now consist of three players (though only two could be on court at any time), with the exception of the new "Rookies" team, which consists of five players, all picked in the 1994 NBA Draft. Players could be substituted into the game between quarters. The game also featured new hidden teams and hidden playable characters.
1995 Sports / Basketball Midway
Neo Turf Masters
Neo Turf Masters (Big Tournament Golf in Japan) is a golf video game by Nazca for the Neo Geo, released in 1996. The player picks one of six available golfers and competes on a number of golf courses around the world. The game features two modes of play. The first is Stroke Play, in which the player attempts to get the best score by playing all 18 holes. The second is Match Play, in which two players compete to see who can win more of the 18 holes. Unlike many golf games of the era which used a two-click swing system to determine the hook or slice of the ball, Neo Turf Masters uses a single click for the power of the shot, and a second for the height of the shot; hook and slice are selected with buttons B and C before making the shot. This makes the game much easier to pick up and play well than its contemporaries, but it compensates for this reduced difficulty with fiendish (if somewhat unrealistic) course layouts and highly variable wind.
1996 Sports / Golf Nazca
Pac-Man
Pac-Man is an arcade game developed by Namco and first released in Japan in May 1980. Immensely popular from its original release to the present day, Pac-Man is considered one of the classics of the medium, and an icon of 1980s popular culture. The player controls Pac-Man through a maze, eating pac-dots (also called pellets or just dots). When all pac-dots are eaten, Pac-Man is taken to the next stage. Between some stages one of three intermission animations plays. Four enemies (Blinky, Pinky, Inky and Clyde) roam the maze, trying to catch Pac-Man. If an enemy touches Pac-Man, he loses a life. Whenever Pac-Man occupies the same tile as an enemy, he is considered to have collided with that ghost. When all lives have been lost, the game ends. Near the corners of the maze are four larger, flashing dots known as power pellets that provide Pac-Man with the temporary ability to eat the enemies. The enemies turn deep blue, reverse direction and usually move more slowly. When an enemy is eaten, its eyes remain and return to the center box where it is regenerated in its normal color. Blue enemies flash white to signal that they are about to become dangerous again and the length of time for which the enemies remain vulnerable varies from one stage to the next, generally becoming shorter as the game progresses. Despite the seemingly random nature of the ghosts, their movements are strictly deterministic, which players have used to their advantage. The red enemy chases Pac-Man from behind, while the pink and blue enemies try to position themselves in front of Pac-Man. The orange ghost chases Pac-Man most of the time, but moves toward the lower-left corner of the maze when it gets too close to Pac-Man.
1980 Maze Namco
Pang! 3
Your character is locked inside an art museum and has to avoid bouncing balloons of various sizes, most of which split when hit. The player has the option of "normal" play with stages or "panic" mode in which balloons will appear continuously. In normal mode, watch out for characters like birds and dogs that will paralyze your character.
1995 Shooter / 3rd Person Capcom
Puzzle Bobble
Puzzle Bobble, also known as Bust-a-Move in North America, is a 1994 tile-matching arcade puzzle video game for one or two players created by Taito . It is based on their popular 1986 arcade game Bubble Bobble, featuring characters and themes from that game. At the start of each round, the rectangular playing arena contains a prearranged pattern of coloured "bubbles". (These are actually referred to in the translation as "balls"; however, they were clearly intended to be bubbles, since they pop, and are taken from Bubble Bobble.) At the bottom of the screen, the player controls a device called a "pointer", which aims and fires bubbles up the screen. The colour of bubbles fired is randomly generated and chosen from the colors of bubbles still left on the screen. The fired bubbles travel in straight lines (possibly bouncing off the side walls of the arena), stopping when they touch other bubbles or reach the top of the arena. If a bubble touches identically-colored bubbles, forming a group of three or more, those bubbles—as well as any bubbles hanging from them—are removed from the field of play, and points are awarded. After every few shots, the "ceiling" of the playing arena drops downwards slightly, along with all the bubbles stuck to it. The number of shots between each drop of the ceiling is influenced by the number of bubble colors remaining. The closer the bubbles get to the bottom of the screen, the faster the music plays and if they cross the line at the bottom then the game is over. The objective of the game is to clear all the bubbles from the arena without any bubble crossing the bottom line. Bubbles will fire automatically if the player remains idle. After clearing the arena, the next round begins with a new pattern of bubbles to clear. The game consists of 32 levels. A two-player mode is included as well. Each player competes on an area occupying half of the screen, dealing with identically generated bubbles. Whenever a player successfully disposes of a bubble group, a part of it is transferred onto the opponent's part of the screen.
1994 Puzzle / Toss Taito Corporation
Puzzle Bobble 2
Puzzle Bobble 2, also known as Bust-a-Move Again in North America, is the first sequel to Puzzle Bobble It was released in 1995 by Taito. The game builds on the original by adding a tournament-style variation on the two player game for play against the computer and by adding a branching map to the one player game, allowing the player to periodically select one of two groups of five levels to play next, leading to different game endings. Some of the contestants in the new tournament mode are based on characters from Bubble Bobble, including variations on a Monsta and a Mighta.
1995 Puzzle / Toss Taito Corporation
Q*bert
Q*bert is an arcade game developed and published by Gottlieb in 1982. It is a 2D action game with puzzle elements that uses "isometric" graphics to create a pseudo-3D effect. The objective is to change the color of every cube in a pyramid by making the on-screen character hop on top of the cube while avoiding obstacles and enemies. Players use a joystick to control the character. The game is played using a single, diagonally mounted four-way joystick. The player controls Q*bert, who starts each game at the top of a pyramid made of 28 cubes, and moves by hopping diagonally from cube to cube. Landing on a cube causes it to change color, and changing every cube to the target color allows the player to progress to the next stage. At the beginning, jumping on every cube once is enough to advance. In later stages, each cube must be hit twice to reach the target color. Other times, cubes change color every time Q*bert lands on them, instead of remaining on the target color once they reach it. Both elements are then combined in subsequent stages. Jumping off the pyramid results in the character's death. Trying to stop Q*bert are many different creatures which wander around the board, including Coily the snake, Slick and Sam, and falling balls. On the edge of the board are floating discs; if Q*bert jumps on one of these discs when the snake is in pursuit, the snake will fall off the board while Q*bert is safely transported to the top.
1982 Platform / Run Jump D. Gottlieb & Co.
Quiz & Dragons
Quiz & Dragons: Capcom Quiz Game is a quiz game released in arcades by Capcom in 1992. The game combines some stylistic elements of RPGs such as a fantasy theme and multiple characters with that of board games to create a unique twist to the quiz game genre. The game plays similar to a board game, where the player is given a predetermined dice roll that moves the player up to six spaces on the board; however, if the player is so given the choice, they can move to a space of his choosing if there is a fork in the road. After landing on a space, the player is given a series of questions (The amount of questions needed to be answered increase as the game progresses) in order to proceed back to the board for another dice roll. The player is given a time limit to answer the question, with points given that vary based on how fast the player answered the question correctly. If the player is successful in answering a question, one of the gems above the enemy's picture will light up, indicating a correct answer. If the player answers a question incorrectly, they will lose a life point. if the player loses all life points, they must continue within the time limit or else the game is over. There are four characters to choose from: the Fighter (who recovers health points faster than the other characters), the Amazon (who is sometimes able to eliminate one or two choices), the Wizard (who is sometimes able to choose the trivia category for an encounter), and the Ninja (who is sometimes able to deal two points of damage instead of one when answering a question correctly).
1992 Quiz / English Capcom
R-Type
R-Type is a side scrolling shoot-em-up arcade game produced by Irem in 1987. The player controls a space fighter named the R-9 to defend humanity against a mysterious powerful alien life-form known as the "Bydo." The game is made up of several sequential levels, with a boss enemy at the end of each. The player controls a small spacecraft and must navigate terrain and fight enemies using the various ship weapons. The player's spacecraft has, by default, a weak but rapid-firing main gun; and a more powerful gun called a wave cannon, which requires the player to hold their fire to build up power for the cannon. When released, this fires a concentrated bolt of energy which can do more damage to larger enemies, and can pass through entire waves of weaker 'single hit' enemies. During the game, the player can obtain an auxiliary device called a Force. This resembles a glowing orange ball. The Force can be attached to the front or back of the player's spacecraft, or detached to fly freely. When attached, the Force provides one of three different powerful weapons, in addition to the main gun and the wave cannon. When detached, these weapons cannot be used, but the Force will instead resort to a secondary set of guns, which can be fired by the player even if the Force is at a distance from the spacecraft. The Force has a secondary use as a shield; it is completely indestructible and can block most things fired at it, as well as damage or destroy enemies on contact. It can also be used as a ram, either by attaching it to the spacecraft and running into enemies, or by launching it into enemies.
1987 Shooter / Flying Horizontal Irem
Raiden
Raiden is a 1990 scrolling shooter arcade game that was developed by Seibu Kaihatsu. It was the first game in the Raiden series of scrolling shooter arcade games. In the year 2090, Earth has suddenly become the target of deranged aliens. Following the invasion, a new cutting-edge weapon, the Raiden Supersonic Attack Figther, based on the destroyed alien craft, is created for humanity's hope for survival. Raiden consists of eight vertical scrolling missions where the player maneuvers the Raiden craft dodging and destroying enemy robots, buildings, ground targets, and aircraft. There are bombs and missile powerups as well as collectable medals which add to the score. When player dies, the fighter's fragments become projectiles that damage enemies. After defeating the Stage 8 boss, the mission is completed, and player receives 1 million points for each completed loop. Afterwards, it will start back to Stage 1. This time around, enemies shoot faster and at a more rapid rate.
1990 Shooter / Flying Vertical Seibu Kaihatsu
Rampage
Rampage is a 1986 arcade game by Bally Midway. Players take control of gigantic monsters trying to survive against onslaughts of military forces. Each round is completed when a particular city is completely reduced to rubble. Up to three simultaneous players control gigantic monsters who were formerly human. The game's protagonists are George, a King Kong-like gigantic gorilla transformed by an experimental vitamin, Lizzie, a Godzilla-like dinosaur/lizard transformed by a radioactive lake, and Ralph, a giant werewolf transformed by a food additive. As monsters, they need to raze all buildings in a high-rise city to advance to the next level, eating people and destroying helicopters, tanks, taxis, police cars, boats, and trolleys along the way. The monsters can climb the buildings, punching them to pieces on the way down which will eventually reduce them to rubble. The various people can also be punched or grabbed and food items can be eaten. The player's monster receives damage from enemy bullets, sticks of dynamite, shells, punches from other monsters and falls. Damage is recovered by eating the various food items such as fruit, roast chicken, or even the soldiers. If a monster takes too much damage, it reverts into a naked human and starts walking off the screen sideways, covering its modesty with its hands (and in this state, can be eaten by another monster). If the player continues, the human mutates back into the monster or (if the human walked off the screen) flies in on a blimp (but has lost their score), with a full life bar.
1986 Platform / Fighter Bally Midway
RoboCop
RoboCop is a game released in 1988 by Data East. In the game, a player controls RoboCop who advances through various stages that are taken from the 1987 movie. The bonus screen is a target shooting range that uses a first-person perspective. The intermission features digitized voices from the actors.
1988 Platform / Shooter Scrolling Data East
RoboCop 2
RoboCop 2 is an arcade game developed and published in 1991 by Data East, which allows up to two players at once (one controlling the original RoboCop, the other controlling a slightly purple-hued clone). The game follows the basic premise of the movie, but has some major sequential differences. It is mostly side-scrolling shoot-em-up, with some levels viewed from behind RoboCop and providing a targeting reticle with which to kill generic criminals.
1991 Fighter / 2.5D Data East
Rolling Thunder
Rolling Thunder is a side-scrolling action game produced by Namco originally released in 1986. The player takes control of a secret agent who must rescue his female partner from a terrorist organization. The player takes control of Albatross, a member of the WCPO's (World Crime Police Organization) "Rolling Thunder" espionage unit. Albatross's mission is to save a missing female agent named Leila Blitz from a secret society named Geldra located in New York. Albatross must travel through two different segments or "stories," each composed of five stages, for a total of ten stages. The player begins the game armed with a standard-issue pistol, which can be substituted with a fully automatic assault rifle that allows for continuous firing by holding down the shoot button. The player can find ammunition for either weapon by entering doors which are marked "bullets" or "arms". If the player runs out of machine gun ammo, they will switch back to the pistol. However, if the pistol runs out of ammo as well, then the player can only fire a slow "chaser" bullets (only one bullet allowed on screen at once) until more ammo is acquired. Despite the presence of a life meter, the player can only take two physical hits from the enemy: a single hit drains half of the meter and the player is killed instantly when struck by a projectile attack such as enemy bullets or lasers.
1986 Platform / Shooter Scrolling Namco
Rolling Thunder 2
Rolling Thunder 2 is a run-and-gun arcade game developed and released in 1990 by Namco. The game is the sequel to 1986's Rolling Thunder, retaining the same gameplay of its predecessor but adding cooperative gameplay for two players and improved graphics. Unlike the original, which was based in 1968, Rolling Thunder 2 features a more contemporary setting to go along with its more futuristic design, as well as an optionally playable female character. Set in the 1990s, the Geldra organization, thought to had been destroyed during the first game, returns and is destroying several of the world's satellites in outer space. As in the original Rolling Thunder, the players must take control of a member of the WCPO's Rolling Thunder task force. Two players can now play simultaneously, with Player 1 as female agent Leila and Player 2 as male agent Albatross. Even though they possess different external appearances, including different handguns, the two characters have identical abilities. As with the original game, both Leila and Albatross can only take two physical hits from the enemies - and a hit from a bullet or other projectile such as a laser will result in an immediate death for them. Both of them are armed with a default pistol that has only limited ammo; when bullets run out, their guns shall fire a slow "chaser" bullet instead. The players can also upgrade to a semi-automatic machine gun, by entering marked doors - and when entering one of these marked doors, a counter shall appear, which indicates the number of remaining bullets left to be picked up (allowing one player to leave ammo for the other).
1990 Platform / Shooter Scrolling Namco
Samurai Aces
Samurai Aces is a vertically-scrolling shoot-em-up video game originally releasaed in the arcades by Psikyo in 1993. The science fantasy story of Sengoku Ace resolves around the six Feudal Japan characters sent on a mission to stop an evil cult and rescue the shogun's kidnapped daughter, Princess Tsukihime, before she can be used as a sacrifice to resurrect their demon god. The game features 21 endings, different for various characters and 2-player pairings.
1993 Shooter / Flying Vertical Psikyo
Samurai Shodown
Samurai Shodown is a competitive fighting game developed and published by SNK for their Neo Geo platform. Released in 1993, it is the first installment in the Samurai Shodown series. In contrast to other fighting games at the time, which were set in modern times and focused primarily on hand-to-hand combat, Samurai Shodown is set in feudal-era Japan and was one of the first fighting games to focus primarily on weapon-based combat after the success of Capcom's Street Fighter II. The game quickly became renowned for its fast pace. Focusing more on quick, powerful strikes than combos, slow motion was added to intensify damage dealt from hard hits. During a match, a referee holds flags representing each player (Player 1 is white; Player 2 is red). When a player lands a successful hit, the referee lifts the corresponding flag, indicating who dealt the blow. Shiro Tokisada Amakusa, once slain by the forces of the Tokugawa Shogunate, is revived. Driven by hatred for the Shogunate, he unleashes his dark powers to bring chaos to the world. An assortment of warriors converge upon the source of the chaos, each driven by their own reasons.
1993 Fighter / Versus SNK
Samurai Shodown II
Samurai Shodown II is a 1994 fighting game released as the second entry in SNK's Samurai Shodown series. The overall gameplay was expanded to include several movement options, such as being able to roll forward and backward, ducking to avoid high attacks, or doing small hops to avoid low strikes. This game was also the first game to incorporate an offensive blocking technique or "parry": via a command issued at the last second, a player would be able to deflect the incoming attack and leave their adversary open to attack for a moment. There are also cameo appearances from other SNK characters, a hidden boss who occasionally emerges to challenge players, and several other treats for fans to uncover.
1994 Fighter / Versus SNK
Shinobi
Shinobi is a side-scrolling action game produced by Sega originally released for the arcades in 1987. In Shinobi, the player controls a modern day ninja named Joe Musashi who goes on a mission to rescue his kidnapped students from a group of terrorists. The controls of Shinobi consist of an eight way joystick and three action buttons for attacking, jumping and using ninjutsu techniques (also called "ninja magic" in the game). In addition to the standard walk, the player can perform a crouching walk by pressing the joystick diagonally downward. The player can jump to higher or lower floors by pressing the jump button while holding the joystick up or down. The protagonist Joe Musashi's standard weapons are an unlimited supply of shurikens, along with punches and kicks when attacking at close range. Rescuing certain hostages in each stage will grant him an attack upgrade. When powered up, his throwing stars are replaced by a gun that fires large, explosive bullets, and his close-range attack becomes a katana slash. Musashi's ninjutsu techniques can only be used once per stage and will clear the screen of all enemies, or in the case of enemy bosses, greatly damage them. There are three ninjutsu techniques in the game — a thunderstorm, a tornado and a doppelganger attack — that vary depending on the stage, although the effect is the same no matter which technique Musashi uses; only the animation changes.
1986 Platform / Fighter Scrolling Sega
Space Invaders
Space Invaders is an arcade video game developed by Taito and released in 1978. One of the earliest shooting games, its aim is to defeat waves of aliens with a laser cannon to earn as many points as possible. It is a two-dimensional fixed shooter game in which the player controls a laser cannon by moving it horizontally across the bottom of the screen and firing at descending aliens. The aim is to defeat five rows of eleven aliens (some versions feature different numbers) that move horizontally back and forth as they advance towards the bottom of the screen. The player defeats an alien, and earns points, by shooting it with the laser cannon. As more aliens are defeated, the aliens' movement and the game's music both speed up. Defeating the aliens brings another wave that is more difficult, a loop which can continue without end.
1978 Shooter / Gallery Taito Corporation
Street Fighter Alpha
Street Fighter Alpha: Warriors' Dreams is a 1995 fighting game by Capcom originally released for the arcade. It was the first all-new Street Fighter game produced by Capcom since the release of Street Fighter II in 1991. The game introduces several new features, expanding on the Super Combo system previously featured in Super Street Fighter II Turb. The plot of Street Fighter Alpha is set after the original Street Fighter but before Street Fighter II and thus the game features younger versions of established characters, as well as characters from the original Street Fighter and Final Fight, and a few who are new to the series. Street Fighter Alpha revamps the Super Combo system introduced in Super Street Fighter II Turbo by adding a three-level Super Combo gauge. Like in Super Turbo, the Super Combo gauge fills in as the player performs regular and special techniques. When the gauge reaches Level 1 or higher, the player can perform a Super Combo technique. The number of punch or kick buttons pressed simultaneously when performing a Super Combo determines the amount that will be used. In addition to Super Combos, the player can also perform a special counterattacking technique called an Alpha Counter (Zero Counter in the Japanese version) after blocking an opponent's attack, which consumes a level of the Super Combo Gauge. There are two playing styles that can be selected after choosing a character: "Normal" and "Auto." Auto differs from Normal in that the character automatically guards against a limited number of attacks (provided the character is not in the middle of performing an attack). Auto also allows the player to perform an instant Super Combo by pressing a punch and kick of the same strength simultaneously, but at the expense of reducing the maximum level of the Super Combo gauge to one. There are also new basic techniques such as Air Blocking, the ability to guard during mid-air, and Chain Combos (also known as Alpha Combos, or Zero Combos in Japan), which are combos that are performed by interrupting the animation of one basic move by performing another of equal or greater strength. In addition to recovering from an opponent's throw, the player also has the ability to roll on the ground when they fall to the ground after an attack.
1995 Fighter / Versus Capcom
Street Fighter Alpha 2
Street Fighter Alpha 2 is a 1996 fighting game originally released for the CPS II arcade hardware by Capcom. The game is both a sequel and a remake to the previous year's Street Fighter Alpha: Warriors' Dreams, which is itself a prequel to the Street Fighter II series in terms of plot and setting. The game featured a number of improvements over the original, such as new endings, stages, moves and gameplay systems. Street Fighter Alpha 2 retains most of the new features introduced in the original Street Fighter Alpha, such as the three-level Super Combo gauge, Alpha Counters, Air-Blocking, and Fall Breaking. The main new feature in the game is the inclusion of the Custom Combo system (Original Combo in Japan), which replaces the Chain Combos from the first Alpha. If the Super Combo gauge is on Lv. 1 or above, the player can initiate a Custom Combo pressing two punch buttons and a kick simultaneously (or vice versa). The player can then perform any series of basic and special moves to create a Custom Combo until the Timer Gauge at the bottom of the screen runs out. The only characters that can still perform Chain Combos in the game are Guy and Gen, but only to a limited extent. Additionally, each character now has two Alpha Counters instead of just one: one that can be performed with a kick button and another with a punch button. The single-player mode, much like the original Street Fighter Alpha, consists of eight matches against computer-controlled opponents, including a fixed final opponent whose identity depends on the player's selected character. Each character also has a secret "rival" whom they can face during the course of the single-player mode after meeting certain requirements, in which then the rival will interrupt one of the player's regularly scheduled matches and exchange dialogue with the player's character. With Akuma now a regular character, a more powerful version of the character dubbed "Shin Akuma" replaces him as a secret opponent. Unlike Super Turbo and the original Alpha, Shin Akuma challenges the player before the player's final opponent, rather than as an alternate final boss.
1996 Fighter / Versus Capcom
Street Fighter II Turbo: Hyper Fighting
Street Fighter II Turbo: Hyper Fighting is a competitive fighting game released for the arcades by Capcom in 1992. It is the third game in the Street Fighter II sub-series of Street Fighter games following Street Fighter II': Champion Edition. Released less than a year after the previous installment, Hyper Fighting introduced a faster playing speed and new special moves for certain characters, as well as further refinement to the character balance.
1992 Fighter / Versus Capcom
Street Fighter II: Champion Edition
Street Fighter II: Champion Edition is a competitive fighting game released for the arcades by Capcom in 1992. It was the first of several updated versions of the original Street Fighter II: The World Warrior. The main changes consisted of the addition of the Grand Masters (the final four computer-controlled opponents in the single-player mode) as playable characters and mirror matches (same character vs. matches). The fighting techniques of the eight main characters from the original game were also further refined to allowed for more balanced competitive play. The four Grand Masters (Balrog, Vega, Sagat, and M. Bison), who were controlled exclusively by the CPU in World Warrior, are now playable characters. The Grand Masters were considerably toned down from the previous iterations, but are still relatively stronger compared to the standard eight fighters. In World Warrior, players were not allowed to choose the same character. This restriction has been eliminated in Champion Edition. Each fighter now has a standard palette and an alternate palette that can chosen by pressing the Start button. If a palette is already chosen by one player, the other player will be automatically assigned the remaining palette. The returning eight main characters had many of their techniques and priorities modified in order to allow for more balanced competition between different characters. Ryu's and Ken's fighting techniques in particular were changed in order to differentiate their respective fighting styles. The number of matches in the single-player mode was increased from 11 opponents to 12 due to the addition of the mirror matches. This also changed the order in which the third bonus stage occurred (the drum-breaking minigame): in the original game it took place after the match with Vega; wherein Champion Edition, it takes place after defeating Balrog. The endings of some of the returning characters were redrawn (particularly Ryu's, Ken's, and Zangief's), while each of the four bosses received an ending as well. The ending for the boss characters consist of an image of all four Grand Masters (with the character used by the player on top), with scrolling text overlaid on it specific to the player character with a large army of demonic looking soldiers marching to the ending music below. Like in World Warrior, the game only shows end credits sequence if the player complete the single-player tournament without losing a match. Whereas the music played in the World Warrior version of the credits was the same music used for the Continue screen, Champion Edition plays an entirely new track instead. The special credits sequence where the player completes the game without losing a single round was also changed, which now depicts the twelve playable fighters performing their special moves on oil drums and crates.
1992 Fighter / Versus Capcom
Strider
Strider is a 1989 side-scrolling platform game released for the CP System arcade hardware by Capcom. It became one of Capcom's early hits before Street Fighter II, revered for its innovative gameplay and unique music. The controls of Strider consist of an eight-way joystick and two action buttons for attacking and jumping. The player controls the protagonist Strider Hiryu, whose main weapon is a tonfa-like plasma sword known as "Cypher." He can perform numerous acrobatic feats depending on the joystick/button combination used. Pressing the jump button while Hiryu is standing still will cause him to do a regular vertical jump, while pressing the jump button while pushing the joystick left or right will enable him to do a cartwheel jump. Hiryu can also slide under or through certain obstacles and enemies by first crouching down and then pressing the jump button. As well as his sliding move, both jumps can also be used to destroy weaker opponents. Hiryu is able to latch onto certain platforms, and climb across walls and ceilings using a metallic hook. While running down a sloped surface, Hiryu can gain enough momentum to allow him to do a longer cartwheel jump than usual. Numerous power-ups can be obtained from item boxes carried by certain enemies. These include an extension to Hiryu's attack range that lasts for one hundred slashes, two types of health aids, a max health extension, an extra life, and a power-up that not only makes Hiryu invulnerable to attack but also increases his own attack abilities via shadow images of himself for 15 seconds. Hiryu can also summon robotic companions known collectively as "options" that help him fight enemies. These consist of up to two mushroom-like droids, a saber-toothed robo tiger and a robot hawk, known individually as Options A, B and C respectively.
1989 Platform / Fighter Scrolling Capcom
Sunset Riders
Sunset Riders is a side-scrolling run and gun video game developed and released by Konami in 1991. The game is set in a fanciful version of the American Old West, where the player takes control of a bounty hunter who is seeking the rewards offered for various criminals. The game revolves around four bounty hunters named Steve, Billy, Bob, and Cormano who are out to claim rewards given for eliminating the most wanted outlaws in the West. At the beginning of each stage the player is shown a wanted poster. Sunset Riders can be played by up to two or four players, depending on the version of the game. In the two-player version each player can choose which of the four bounty hunters (Steve, Billy, Bob, and Cormano) to play as at the start of the game, while in the four-player version each character is assigned to a different control panel. Steve and Billy wield revolvers, while Bob uses a rifle and Cormano uses a shotgun. The controls consists of an eight way joystick for moving the character and aiming their guns, and two buttons for shooting and jumping. The player can jump between higher and lower floors by holding the joystick up or down while pressing the jump button. There's also a slide move that allows the player's character to avoid enemy fire by pressing the jump button while holding the joystick diagonally downwards.
1991 Platform / Shooter Scrolling Konami
Super High Impact
Super High Impact is a football arcade game developed by Midway and released in 1991. A caricature of professional football, the game features late hits and several outright fights during each game, making it a spiritual predecessor to Midway's later NFL Blitz series. It is the sequel to 1990's High Impact Football. The fifteen teams from the original game all return, and three new teams have been introduced. Three different skill level options have also been introduced (for when a player competes against the AI instead of another human), along with a "Hit-O-Meter" to measure the power of defensive stops, a "Fighting Mode", and "World Record" standings; it also gave the players unique access codes for lifetime statistics and standings based on won and lost records.
1991 Sports / Football Midway
Super Puzzle Fighter II Turbo
Super Puzzle Fighter II Turbo, commonly referred to as Puzzle Fighter, is a one- or two- player tile-matching puzzle video game first released in the spring of 1996 by Capcom. The game's title is a parody of Super Street Fighter II Turbo (or Super Street Fighter II X in Japan), as there are no other Puzzle Fighter games, and the game includes music and interface elements spoofing the Street Fighter Alpha and Darkstalkers games. In Puzzle Fighter, the player controls pairs of blocks ("gems" in game parlance) that drop into a pit-like playfield (twelve blocks tall by six blocks wide).Gems can only be eliminated by coming into contact with a Crash Gem of the same color, which eliminates all adjacent gems of that color, setting up the potential for huge chain reactions. As gems are eliminated, "garbage blocks" called Counter Gems will drop into the opponent's playfield; these will eventually become normal gems, but only after they count down to zero (most Counter Gems start at "5" and are reduced by one each time a new pair of gems is dropped on that board), and until that time they cannot be eliminated by normal means. Additionally, gems of the same color that form squares or rectangles (of at least two blocks tall and wide) in the pit become a giant Power Gem of that size and color; eliminating these as part of a combo increases the number of Counter Gems that would otherwise normally appear on the opponent's board. The only other type of piece to appear is a diamond, which eliminates all the gems —normal, Power, Counter, and Crash alike — of whichever color gem it lands on. (This, too, will cause Counter Gems to appear on the opponent's board. The diamond piece appears every 25 pieces.
1996 Puzzle / Drop Capcom
Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles
Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles is a side-scrolling beat-'em-up released by Konami as a coin-operated video game in 1989. It is based on the first Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles animated series which began airing in the winter of 1987. The original coin-operated game was distributed to the arcades in two variants: a standard 2-player version that allowed either player to choose their character and a deluxe 4-player version with each player controlling a different character. The player chooses from one of the four Ninja Turtles: Leonardo, Michelangelo, Donatello, and Raphael. After Shredder kidnaps the Turtles' friend April O'Neil and their mentor Splinter, they must give chase, save their comrades, and defeat the evil Shredder. Up to four players (two in some versions) can take control of any of the Turtles. Donatello has slower attacks but a longer range, Michelangelo and Raphael have faster attacks but a shorter range, and Leonardo is a well-rounded Turtle with average range and speed. The eight-way joystick controls the movements of the Turtle, the jump button makes them jump, and the attack button makes them strike in front of them using their weapon. In addition to this, some combinations are possible. The Turtles can throw Foot soldiers overhead, and can perform a special attack by pressing the jump and attack buttons. (Raphael rolls along the ground and finishes with a kick, while the other Turtles do a sweeping jump attack with their weapons.) Turtles can also spring off the wall in certain areas. Enemies can be defeated more quickly by slamming them into walls or solid objects. Many objects such as traffic cones, parking meters, fire hydrants and exploding oil drums can be hit or damaged with attacks in order to help defeat nearby enemies. The majority of the enemies the Turtles must face are the Foot Soldiers. They wear a different colored uniform depending on what weapon they have. The purple-clad Foot Soldiers, the most standart of them, also have the ability to hold the Turtles from behind, draining their health and leaving them open to attack by the other Foot soldiers. The bosses in the game includes Bebop and Rocksteady (individually and together), Baxter Stockman, Granitor, General Traag, Krang, and Shredder himself.
1989 Fighter / 2.5D Konami
Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles: Turtles In Time
Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles: Turtles in Time is an arcade video game produced by Konami. A sequel to the original Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles (TMNT) arcade game, it is a scrolling beat 'em up type game based mainly on the 1987 TMNT animated series. Like its predecessor, Turtles in Time was available for the arcades in two and four-player versions. In the two-player versions, each player gets to choose which of the four turtles they wish to control, whereas in the four-player versions the characters are assigned to the control panel from left to right in the following order: Leonardo, Michelangelo, Donatello, and Raphael. Each playable character has his own strengths and weaknesses. New features in this game include the ability to execute a power attack by hitting an enemy several times in a row, and the ability to slam Foot Soldiers into surrounding enemies. The game features the same control scheme as the previous arcade release. It uses a joystick for movement, an attack button and a jump button. Certain joystick/button combinations can make a Turtle run, perform a slide or dash attack, jump higher, perform a stationary or directed air attack, or perform a special attack. Players guide the turtles through a series of levels. The first takes place in the streets of New York City. Later levels transport the turtles to representations of various historical eras. In each level, players face enemies from both the 1987 cartoon and the feature film Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles II: The Secret of the Ooze, including Foot Soldier and Stone Warriors. Bosses include the fly form of Baxter Stockman, Metalhead, Tokka and Rahzar and Leatherhead.
1991 Fighter / 2.5D Konami
Tetris
Tetris is a puzzle game developed by Atari Games and originally released for arcades in 1988. Based on Alexey Pajitnov's Tetris, Atari's version features the same gameplay as the computer editions of the game, as players must stack differently shaped falling blocks to form and eliminate horizontal lines from the playing field. The game features several difficulty levels and two-player simultaneous play.
1988 Puzzle / Drop Atari
The King of Dragons
The King of Dragons is a side-scrolling hack-and-slash video game released in 1991 by Capcom. It allows players to choose from five characters (Elf, Wizard, Fighter, Cleric, and Dwarf) and travel through the kingdom of Malus and defeat the monsters that have taken over, as well as their leader, the red dragon Gildiss. Like Capcom's Knights of the Round, it features a level advancement system, allowing character attributes to be upgraded as players progress through the game. The setting is very similar to that of Dungeons & Dragons and other medieval fantasy worlds, with familiar monsters such as Orcs, Gnolls, Harpies, Wyverns, Cyclopes, and Minotaurs. The game has 16 levels, though many are quite short. King of Dragons features a role-playing video game-like level advancement system. Points scored for killing monsters and picking up gold count towards experience, and the character gains levels at regular intervals. With each level, the character's health bar increases, other attributes such as range improve, and the character also becomes invulnerable for a few seconds. Along the way, different weapon and armor upgrades for each character may also be picked up. King of Dragons features a simple control system that consists of a single attack button, and a jump button. By pressing both buttons, the character unleashes a magical attack that strikes all enemies in screen (its strength varies according to the character used) at the expense of losing energy. The fighter, cleric and dwarf can also use their shield to block certain attacks by tilting the joystick back right before the impact.
1991 Fighter / 2.5D Capcom
The King of Fighters '98
The King of Fighters '98 (commonly abbreviated as KOF '98) is a 1998 fighting arcade game released by SNK. It is the fifth game in The King of Fighters series. This installment was advertised by SNK as a "special edition" of the series, as it featured most of the characters who appeared in the previous games (from KOF '94 to '97), regardless of whether the character was killed off in the series' ongoing storyline (which would be resumed in the following game in the series with a new story arc). The gameplay does not differ much from the previous game, KOF '97. Like in KOF '97, the player has a choice between two playing styles: Advance and Extra, with a few slight modifications to Advance mode. This time when one character loses a round, the losing team is given a handicap in its favor. In Advance mode, this means that the player's stock capacity for Power Gauges is increased by one. In Extra mode, the time it takes to charge one's power gauge to maximum level is shortened.
1998 Fighter / Versus SNK
The Simpsons
The Simpsons is an arcade beat-em-up game developed by Konami and released in 1991. It is the first arcade game based on The Simpsons franchise. The game allows up to four players to control members of the Simpson family, as they fight various enemies in order to rescue the kidnapped Maggie. As the Simpson Family; Homer, Marge, Bart, Lisa and Maggie, take a stroll through town, they encounter a jewelry store being robbed by Waylon Smithers, who bumps into Homer, leading a precious diamond he stole to land in Maggie's mouth. With Maggie using the diamond as a makeshift pacifier, Smithers takes Maggie with him, sending various goons to keep the Simpsons from following him. Fighting their way through various areas, such as Krustyland, Moe's Tavern and even a dream world, the Simpsons eventually arrive at the Springfield Nuclear Power Plant, where they face off against not only Smithers, but also Mr. Burns, who attacks them in a plutonium-powered mech. After managing to defeat Burns, the Simpsons rescue Maggie and head back home, throwing the diamond away. Each player plays as a member of the Simpsons family: Marge, who swings her vacuum cleaner; Homer, who punches and kicks; Bart, who wields his skateboard; and Lisa, who attacks with a jump rope. Along with the standard array of jumping and attacking, two players can team up to form a joint attack, which differs depending on which characters are used. For example, Homer can lift Bart up to use him as a melee weapon, whilst teaming him up with Marge puts them into a powerful cartwheel attack. Players can also pick up food items to restore health, as well as objects they can throw at enemies and items that temporarily power up their attacks. Players are given a small number of lives, which are lost if the player's life bar runs out. If the player runs out of life with no lives remaining (represented by a Bart-like devil appearing before them), the player has 20 seconds to add credits or the game ends. At certain points in the game, players compete against each other in button-bashing minigames to earn additional points (computer controlled characters replace characters not being played by real people).
1991 Fighter / 2.5D Konami
Timber
Timber is an action arcade game that was manufactured by Midway Games in 1984. The object of the game is to amass points by chopping down trees or by balancing on a floating, rotating log. Controlling one of two lumberjacks, the player runs madly around the screen chopping down trees as they sprout out of the ground while racing the clock and avoiding beehive-throwing bears.
1984 Platform / Run Jump Marvin Glass and Associates
Time Pilot
Time Pilot is a multi-directional scrolling shooter and free-roaming aerial combat arcade game released by Konami in 1982. Debuting in the golden age of video arcade games, it is a time travel themed game that allowed the player's plane to freely move across open air space that can scroll indefinitely in all directions. The player assumes the role of a pilot of a futuristic fighter jet, trying to rescue fellow pilots trapped in different time eras. The player must fight off hordes of enemy craft and defeat the mother ship (or "boss") present in every level. The background moves in the opposite direction to the player's plane, rather than the other way around; the player's plane always remains in the center.
1982 Shooter / Field Konami
Tumble Pop
Tumblepop is an arcade game released in 1991 by Data East. The game involves one or two ghost-busters who can suck monsters, ghosts, aliens and various other oddball characters into vacuum-cleaner-like devices and spit them back as bouncing/rolling balls. Expelled enemies function as projectiles that can damage and kill other opponents on the screen when colliding with them. Throughout the game, the player/s can collect letters of the alphabet found in randomly appearing bubbles in order to gradually spell the word "TUMBLEPOP", the progress of which is permanently displayed at the bottom of the screen. When the word is completed, players are transported to a bonus level which gives them the opportunity to obtain higher scores and an extra life. The protagonists work their way through stages set in different parts of the world (and outer space), each with their own enemies and at least one boss: Moscow, Egypt, Paris, New York City, Rio de Janeiro, Antarctica, Japan, outer space, and the moon. The player/s has to complete every level within a specific period of time before exceeding an invisible timer. If the players do not manage to eliminate all the monsters in time, a Dracula-like beast appears and approaches them with a sinister laugh. If the beast manages to touch a player before he/she eliminates all the monsters, the player suffers an instant loss of a life.
1991 Platform / Run Jump Data East
Undercover Cops
Undercover Cops is an arcade-style beat-em-up arcade game developed and published by Irem in 1992. Players control "city sweepers", a police agent-like group who fight crime by taking down thugs in New York City of the year 2043. The video game is notable for its detailed backgrounds and grimy futuristic setting. For its time, it was relatively gory, featuring crow-pecked skeletons in the midst of its urban wastelands and forcing players to lose a life by being crushed by a garbage compactor during the first boss battle. While the gameplay is inspired by Final Fight, some of the enemies are unique. Besides the usual human thugs, players fight strange mole creatures and mutants with jet packs and blades for hands. Players can never use enemy weapons, but the stages contain objects that can be picked up and used instead such as burning oil drums, steel girders, long concrete column]s that shatter on impact, boxes of hand grenades, and even fish.
1992 Fighter / 2.5D Irem
Vendetta
Vendetta is a 1991 side-scrolling beat-em-up arcade game developed and published by Konami. It is the sequel to the 1989 Konami game Crime Fighters. The four men of the game's hero gang, The Cobras, fight through waves of enemies to rescue Kate, The Cobras' fifth member, who was kidnapped by the Dead End Gang. As with most beat-em-ups, the game features primarily side-scrolling action. Player score is based on number of opponents eliminated. The option of attacking an enemy while they are knocked down was new to the genre. The game uses 'punch' and 'kick' buttons rather than the more common 'jump' and 'attack.' The special punch-plus-kick attack is the only aerial attack. Players can also double-team enemies and vice versa. The hero gang, called The Cobras, numbers five members: Blood (former prizefighter, with a passing resemblance to Mike Tyson), Hawk (former professional wrestler, with passing resemblance to Hulk Hogan), Boomer (a martial artist, possibly based on Jean-Claude Van Damme), Sledge (a military ex-convict with passing resemblance to Mr. T), and Kate, the damsel in distress, described as Hawk's protegee and wearing a blue shirt similar to his. One day, Kate is kidnapped by the Dead End Gang under the leadership of Faust. The four men go save her, fighting through the waves of enemies that are sent against them.
1991 Fighter / 2.5D Konami
Virtua Fighter
Fight the best martial arts masters with over 700 precision moves! Unleash hair-trigger punch/kick combos, throws and crushing stomps! Each warrior has a personal fighting style, attack strength and special moves. Rapid, realistic 360-degree combat with 3D polygon graphics. See the fighters from all sides! Fluid animations look just like real fighters. Get totally wrapped up in the action!
1993 Fighter / Versus Sega AM2
Windjammers
Windjammers (also known as Flying Power Disc in Japan) is a fast-paced sports arcade game released by Data East in 1994. The game mechanics are essentially the same as Pong or air hockey, where players continuously shoot the disc at the goal zone of the opponent attempting to score. There are six characters a player may choose from, each with their own speed/power settings, nationality and special throw. The goal zones vary in layout across the different settings, but each is divided into at least one three-point zone and one five-point zone. Several of the couhrses also have posts installed in the middle of the course; these can change the path of the disc when they're struck, making for a more unpredictable match. There are two standard throws: a flat, Pong-like throw and a lob. The flat throw can travel in a straight line or with a curve, depending on how the joystick is moved before the throw. The standard lob has no chance of scoring a goal, but can score two points if the opponent does not catch the lob. (This gives rallies a similar sort of feel to tennis: playing near the center of the court is an aggressive but risky move, for it gives the player less time to react and leaves them vulnerable to lobs.) The earlier the player arrives at the spot where the disc will land — as happens with all lobs and when flat throws take certain deflections — the more time they have to “charge up” their throw. With enough charge, the player can unleash one of three different special throws, each of which is fast, unpredictable, and hard to defend against. The standard flat throw varies from character to character, but the player can also unleash a fast, circling flat throw or a fast lobbed throw, each of which is identical across characters. All special throws will score a goal if not caught — and, with enough power, some will score a goal even if they're caught, as they'll drive the opponent backwards into the goal. Finally, a player can sometimes perform a counter move: when the opponent charges and launches a Special Throw, if the player can grab the disc while directly facing their opponent and then quickly throw it, the disc will be returned with the same special movement of the opponent's Special throw but even faster (allowing for multiple counters to reach incredible speeds). The format of gameplay borrows from the fighting games of the era. In single-player mode, the player competes against each of the five other characters (plus a mirror match), and at any time a second player can insert a credit and challenge Player 1.
1994 Sports / Misc. Data East
X-Men (2 Players)
X-Men is an arcade game produced by Konami in 1992. It is a side-scrolling beat-em=up based on the Marvel Comics characters of the same name. In the game, players control one of the six playable X-Men to defeat their enemy Magneto. The object of the game is to progress as far as possible while surviving attacks from Magneto and his minions. The character is controlled with a standard joystick, an attack button, a jump button, and a mutant power button. In addition to right and left, the character can move up and down the screen as well which adds a three-dimensional feel to the game. Every character is able to fight with punches, kicks, or other close combat attacks; each also has a unique mutant power which can be used to defeat multiple enemies on the screen at once. The use of a mutant power is very effective, but also costly since it causes a character to lose three health points. Normally, a character who drops below four health can no longer use any mutant powers, but it is also possible for characters to obtain bonus mutant powers which can be stored like items.
1992 Fighter / 2.5D Konami
X-Men (4 Players)
X-Men is an arcade game produced by Konami in 1992. It is a side-scrolling beat-em=up based on the Marvel Comics characters of the same name. In the game, players control one of the six playable X-Men to defeat their enemy Magneto. The object of the game is to progress as far as possible while surviving attacks from Magneto and his minions. The character is controlled with a standard joystick, an attack button, a jump button, and a mutant power button. In addition to right and left, the character can move up and down the screen as well which adds a three-dimensional feel to the game. Every character is able to fight with punches, kicks, or other close combat attacks; each also has a unique mutant power which can be used to defeat multiple enemies on the screen at once. The use of a mutant power is very effective, but also costly since it causes a character to lose three health points. Normally, a character who drops below four health can no longer use any mutant powers, but it is also possible for characters to obtain bonus mutant powers which can be stored like items.
1992 Fighter / 2.5D Konami

Laserdisc Games

Game Year Genre Manufacturer
Dragon’s Lair
Dragon’s Lair is a laserdisc video game published by Cinematronics in 1983 as the first game in the Dragon's Lair series. In the game, the protagonist Dirk the Daring is a knight attempting to rescue Princess Daphne from the evil dragon Singe who has locked the princess in the foul wizard Mordroc's castle. It featured animation by ex-Disney animator Don Bluth. Most other games of the era represented the character as a sprite, which consisted of a series of pixels displayed in succession. Due to hardware limitations of the era, artists were greatly restricted in the detail they could achieve using that technique; the resolution, framerate and number of frames were severely constrained. Dragon's Lair overcame those limitations by tapping into the vast storage potential of the LaserDisc, but imposed other limitations on the actual gameplay. The attract mode of the game displays various short vignettes of gameplay accompanied by the following narration: “Dragon's Lair: The fantasy adventure where you become a valiant knight, on a quest to rescue the fair princess from the clutches of an evil dragon. You control the actions of a daring adventurer, finding his way through the castle of a dark wizard, who has enchanted it with treacherous monsters and obstacles. In the mysterious caverns below the castle, your odyssey continues against the awesome forces that oppose your efforts to reach the Dragon's Lair. Lead on, adventurer. Your quest awaits!”
1983 Interactive Movie Advanced Microcomputer Systems
Dragon’s Lair II: Time Warp
Dragon’s Lair II: Time Warp is a 1991 laserdisc video game by the Leland Corporation. It is regarded as the first "true" sequel to Dragon's Lair. It takes place years after the original Dragon’s Lair. Dirk has married Daphne, and the marriage has produced many children. When Daphne is kidnapped by the evil wizard Mordroc in order to be forced into marriage, Dirk's children and his mother-in-law are clearly upset by the abduction of Daphne, and Dirk must once again save her. As with the original, Dragon’s Lair II: Time Warp consists of an animated short film that requires the player to move the joystick or press a fire button at certain times in order to continue. The game follows a traditional damsel in distress storyline where Dirk the Daring must find and rescue Daphne with the help of a well-spoken time machine. It seems that the time machine is (or has been possessed by) the brother of Mordroc, the foul wizard that has kidnapped Daphne. Dirk travels through several dimensions and historical eras searching for Daphne, some inspired by classic stories and fairy tales such as Alice in Wonderland and Sleeping Beauty, to prevent Mordroc from enslaving Daphne to his whim with the dreaded Death Ring.
1991 Interactive Movie Advanced Microcomputer Systems
Space Ace
Space Ace is a laserdisc video game produced by Don Bluth Studios, Cinematronics and Advanced Microcomputer Systems. Like its predecessor Dragon's Lair, the game required the player to move the joystick or press the fire button at key moments in the animated sequences to govern the hero's actions. However, the game's action was more varied with the player occasionally given the temporary option to either have the character he is controlling transform back into his adult form, or remain as a boy with different styles of challenges. Space Ace follows the adventures of the dashing hero Dexter, who prefers to be called "Ace." Ace is on a mission to stop the villainous Commander Borf, who is seeking to attack Earth with his "Infanto Ray" to render Earthlings helpless by transforming them into infants. At the start of the game, Ace is partially hit by the Infanto Ray, which transforms him into an adolescent version of himself, and Borf kidnaps his side-kick Kimberly, who thus becomes the game's "Damsel in Distress." It is up to the player to guide Dexter, Ace's younger incarnation, through a series of obstacles in pursuit of Borf, in order to rescue Kimberly and prevent Borf using the Infanto Ray to conquer Earth. However, Dexter has a wristwatch-gadget which can optionally allow Dexter to "ENERGIZE" and temporarily reverse the effects of the Infanto-Ray to turn him back into his adult self "Ace" for a short time, and overcome more difficult obstacles in a heroic manner.
1984 Interactive Movie Advanced Microcomputer Systems